Fruktnøtt

Everyone has their favorite. Be it Kvik Lunsj, Firkløver, or Helnøtt, we all have that one particular Norwegian chocolate bar that we gravitate towards. This tasty coffee from Finca Los Pirineos in El Salvador is those of you who can’t get enough Fruktnøtt in your life.

We apparently have a thing for coffee produced by Gilberto Baraona, with good reason — it’s hella good. It’s got some hazelnut, milk chocolate, along with the intermittent raisin. It’s full of complexity and a fruity floral element that ignites your sense of wonder. There’s something for every coffee lover in this cup.

Finca Los Pirineos has existed for well over 100 years, having narrowly survived the Salvadoran civil war that lasted through the entire 1980s. Gilberto Baraona’s grandparents, the original owners of Los Pirineos, encouraged the younger generation to take up coffee farming again after the war. Gilberto Baraona had the tenacity to take up ownership of the farm after the war and has had remarkable success.

He has committed to growing coffee well, with care. He explores a variety of factors that impact the coffee as it grows on his farm that sits on the Tepeca volcano in Usulatan. He experiments with growing different varieties at varying altitudes to understand where each coffee variety will flourish. He has made calculated risks with controlled experiments with preparations and processes with superb results.

  • Gilberto Baraona

  • Los Pirineos

  • Usulután

  • 2018

  •  Fully washed

  • Bourbon

  • 1350 -1550 masl

  • Sandy loam, Volcanic soils

  • Nordic Approach

  • medium to dark

  • Nectarine & Dark Chocolate

    We taste 80% dark chocolate and stone fruit, specifically nectarine, along with some creamy & bitter walnut.

  • Jasmine & peach

    Peaches & cream, in the way only an Ethiopian coffee can bring you all of the peaches and cream. Jasmine flowers and intricate bitters that stimulate your senses to finish it off. We’ve immensely enjoyed coffee from the Boji wet mill in the Kochere region on multiple occasions and are thrilled to bring it back for another run.

  • Earl Grey & Rosehip

    It’s calm with a lovely lightly bitter black tea aftertaste, has a grounded structure, and it doesn’t have that super typical natural funkiness (though definitely still a natural). There's fruit as you'd expect: papaya and lime. We're happy to share this easy drinking coffee as we roll into summertime.

  • Fruktnøtt

    Everyone has their favorite. Be it Kvik Lunsj, Firkløver, or Helnøtt, we all have that one particular Norwegian chocolate bar that we gravitate towards. This tasty coffee from Finca Los Pirineos in El Salvador is those of you who can’t get enough Fruktnøtt in your life.

  • Lingonberry & Cream

    It’s as though a human-sized raspberry is running full speed ahead at you, into your mouth - you’re a little freaked out by it, but then it gives you a massive sweet juicy hug and all is well with the world. So sugar cane sweet, bold and bright. Uniquely fresh crop Kenyan in the very best way.

  • Plum & Almonds

    Sold out. Having spent some time living in Andean Ecuador, only a few hundred kilometers south from where finca Los Idolos is located in Nariño, Colombia in the south western corner of Colombia, I am reminded of the immense variety of geography, climates, ecosystems, and subsequent biodiversity of this area of the world. This coffee from Edgar Meneses at Finca Los Idolos has a plum-like acidity, gentle sweetness, and is well balanced by an almond and creamy yet clear and clean body.

  • Honey & Rose

    Sold out. That feeling when it’s still a little brisk outside, and you can’t help but sit in the bright sunshine, letting it warm you after the long dark winter. That is what this coffee is — it’s highly anticipated springtime, finally right around the corner. This cup contains honey sticky sweetness and rose; it’s balanced with a hint of refreshing bitters.

  • Orange & Walnut

    Sold out. A bright Colombian; this is a classic coffee from Hugo Guarnizo in the Tarqui department of Colombia. It was harvested during the secondary smaller harvest that occurs in Colombia; this is known colloquially as the mitaka.